Letter to a Photographer’s Family

Letter to photographer's family

If you recently received a new camera or found your passion for photography, feel free to share this letter with your loved ones. They need time to let it all sink in.

Dear Husband/Wife, Mother/Father, Son/Daughter, or Friend of someone who loves photography,

Someone you love has recently either received a new camera or has found their passion for photography. This is wonderful. We all search for something to be passionate about and it is so exciting they have found theirs.

Their obsession for photography may have started once they had children. Many times, a child will spark a need in us to document every.single.moment of their lives.

Here are a few things to know as they dive deeper into photography.

1. They love it.
Although, they may cry and even shout sometimes when trying to capture the “perfect” shot, they really do love photography. They have found something that stirs their soul and helps them feel more like themselves. If they are a parent, it is wonderful to have something that is just for them to feel like an individual. Yes, looking at it from the outside may have you questioning their love for as they curse at their camera when something goes wrong but this is all part of the learning process. We all go through it. As time goes on, they will not be so hard on themselves and their subjects and photography will become a more enjoyable experience for everyone. Be patient.

2. You may not see their face for months.
Every time you look at your loved one, you are greater with a big DSLR in your face. Where did your loved one go? They are still there. Just learning and capturing everything around them. Just like anything else, photography is something that needs to be practiced daily if possible. That means when you go to the park, zoo, mall or grocery store they may have their camera in front of their face the whole time. Don’t act embarrassed or annoyed. I’m sure your loved one has put up with some crazy stuff you have done as well. Be patient.

3. Photography is expensive.
Your loved one may start to ask for gift cards to camera stores for birthdays and Christmas. Photography is an expensive hobby between gear and education. It may take several birthdays and holidays for them to save up enough to buy a single lens. Please try to keep your cool the first time they approach you with wanting to buy a lens that costs over a $1,000. Lenses may become their new item to collect. We really like lenses. As my husband says “Start saving now, Christmas just got a lot more expensive.” Be patient.

4. They may forget to live in the moment.
I’m going to be honest, when they start down this amazing journey of photography they are going to forget to live in the moment. They will be too busy photographing every minute of someone’s birthday party, they forget to put the camera down and sing along. They forget to soak in the laughter and good times. Help them to remember to be present in the moment and not to live life through the view finder. It will take time for them to come around but I promise if you are kind about this, they will appreciate the reminder. Be patient.

5. Keep encouraging.
There will be days they want to quit. Please don’t let them. When learning something new it is easy to become frustrated especially if you don’t see a massive improvement over night. It will take time…years for many (myself included) to see the progress they want in their image. Encourage them to print their photos if they hit a lull. When a photographer holds one of their images in their hands it is extremely fulfilling and can help them keep going. Be patient.

Be patient.

Critique Me – Chanel French

Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thanks to Chanel French for submitting the following image.
Settings: ISO 100 | f/2.8 | SS 1/400
Chantel French

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