Quick Tip: White Foam board Reflector

how to use a white foam board as a reflector

One of my favorite tools for shooting in the house when not having a lot of light to illuminate my subject is to use a foam board. These are basic boards you can find at any craft store. I like the one that are a tri-fold. This allows the board to stand on its own so I don’t have to hold it like a regular reflector. This is helpful when photographing younger children and you need your hands free to either quickly grab your child or to hold a toy to get your child engaged. Here is an example with my cute little man as a model. He is placed about 4 feet from a sliding glass door camera right. In the photo with the foam board, the board is placed about 3 feet camera left. These are SOOC and shot with a Nikon D700 and Sigma 35mm 1.4.

Without Foam board
WithoutReflector1

With Foam board
WithReflector1

Setup

The effect is soft and helps soften the shadows on him as well as brighten the rug he is laying on. I like them both and would definitely edit both. I like how the shadows on the non-board play to his facial expression and how using the foam board in the second shot boost the lighting to help give off the happy mood he is showing. I hope you try out this fun tip and if you do make sure to post your photo to Facebook so we can see!

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Maternity Photos: A Different Perspective

maternity photos

Who doesn’t love documenting their pregnancy? Just like everything else we love to photograph, when we become pregnant we want to record our journey. But sometimes getting in front of the camera is the absolute last thing we want to do. Trust me, I’m there right now. I am currently 28 weeks pregnant and my days consist of waking up, getting my kid to and from school, cooking, cleaning and taking a nap if I can. The last thing I want to do is get dolled up and look pretty in front of the camera. So I had to think outside the box on how I can capture my pregnancy without it being too much work during my already busy day.

Here is the criteria I had for myself when I decided to finally get my first belly shots:

  • I don’t want to have to spend a lot of time getting ready.
  • I want to include my daughter. It’s very important to me that everything baby includes his big sister.
  • I wanted it as natural as possible.
  • Last, I wanted to use as minimal equipment as possible.

Sounds like a loaded job right there but turns out it’s not. Have you ever seen on blogs or Instragram photos people hashtag with #frommyview? The second I thought of that, I knew my photos should be what I see every day. That tackles #1 because it’s my view not a view of me.

So I headed towards our largest light source in our house and called my daughter over. Started talking with her about being a big sister and got her to interact with my belly. Criteria two and three are checked off! And because it was from my perspective I didn’t need a tripod or anything I just held my camera. List completed!

The result was this set of photos with my oldest snuggling up to her baby brother. She thought it was a lot of fun and these are photos I will always treasure.

007 Baby Bump Adalyn-36

007 Baby Bump Adalyn-13

007 Baby Bump Adalyn-50

I challenge you change your perspective today with whatever you choose to shoot.

Read more ideas to capture a pregnancy

- Pregnancy Photography: 12 Dos and Don’ts for Flawless Maternity Portraits
- Maternity Photos – Why Didn’t I Think of That?

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Before and After Editing: Clean Edit

Hi all, today I wanted to show you one of my basic clean edits that is in my workflow. I love this photo of my daughter that I took with my Lensbaby Spark but as you can see it needs some brightening and warmth to it. So we will start with my SOOC photo. First I start with my photo in Lightroom. How much editing I do in LR is on a picture by picture bases. But I can almost 100% guarantee that I use the tone curve on every photo. Below you can see the adjustments I did on the tone curve ...continue reading

Before and After Editing: Clean Edit

Photoshop Editing: Creating Negative Space

Photoshop Editing: Creating Negative Space

Today I am going to share a little Photoshop editing tip on how to create more negative space with the free transform tool. Sometimes cloning or using the spot healing tool can become a very frustrating process. I picked up this technique to learn how to quickly expand my frame and it has saved me a world of time. However, I do need to point out that this will not work on every shot. Photographs with backgrounds that have textures, patterns or objects in them are not going to benefit from this ...continue reading

Dramatic Lighting: From Start to Finish

Dramatic Lighting: From Start to Finish

I got a lot of questions about a photo I took of my daughter with some dramatic lighting. There are several ways to achieve this shot but I’m going to show you the way I like to do it. From setup to editing. Here is the original photo. But today I'm going to show you how to achieve this with an updated photo of myself. First off, this is for the most part a staged and creative edit shoot for me. In one case I am able to get this with my daughter just hanging out but you must be ...continue reading