Click it Up a Notch http://clickitupanotch.com Photography Tips: Basic Photography Tips Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:42:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 3 Tips for Photographing Your Kids Together http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/3-tips-photographing-kids-together/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/3-tips-photographing-kids-together/#comments Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:16:45 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14826 Author information
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Melissa Noste - Contributor
My photography started 10 years ago in high school with film and the darkroom. Through the years I’ve studied, taken classes, and upgraded cameras and lens. Photography has become my biggest passion, outside of my family of course. My beautiful baby girl pushed me to learn more when she was born in 2010 so I could capture her growing up. | More Posts | Website | Facebook My Camera Bag: Nikon D700 | 50mm f/1.4G
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Do you struggle with photographing your kids together? I think we all do. Follow these 3 simple tips to snag an image of your kiddos in the same shot.

1. Start with the more willing subjects. A majority of the time when I photograph families there is one child who is more willing to take the photo and my kids are no different. My little man is such a ham and will sit for me and smile away. So I set up my blanket, choose my angle and meter all with just him in the frame to get ready.
Connor

2. Always bring another set of hands. Since my daughter is the one who does not like getting her photo taken, she tends to not want to be around during the set up process. I can’t be in two places so I always bring my husband with me. That way when I am prepping he is tending to her and I can focus on what needs to be done before I bring her into the frame. He is also great at fixing things for me and moving the kiddos around.
HelperWEB

3. Shoot fast and know your time is limited. I know this common sense but I really have to remind myself when I photograph my own kids. You know the saying kids behave better for others? Well my kids are the hardest subjects I photograph when I’m trying to get that one posed shot. So I go into it ready to hold that shutter down and know that within minutes they are done and I need to be done as well.
Siblings

Every time I have set up a shoot for my children and remind myself of these three tips, I have always come out with a frame worthy picture. Hope this helps and if you have any other tips that have helped when photographing your own children I’d love if you’d share in the comments below!

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Melissa Noste - Contributor
My photography started 10 years ago in high school with film and the darkroom. Through the years I’ve studied, taken classes, and upgraded cameras and lens. Photography has become my biggest passion, outside of my family of course. My beautiful baby girl pushed me to learn more when she was born in 2010 so I could capture her growing up. | More Posts | Website | Facebook My Camera Bag: Nikon D700 | 50mm f/1.4G
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Critique Me – Jocey of Jocey Marie Photography http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-jocey-jocey-marie-photography/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-jocey-jocey-marie-photography/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 18:31:36 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14837 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thanks to Jocey of Jocey Marie Photography for submitting the following information.
Settings: ISO 200 | SS 1/125 | f/3.2
jocey marie photography

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Focus Stacking: The secret to increased depth of field in macro photography http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/focus-stacking-macro-photography/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/focus-stacking-macro-photography/#comments Wed, 10 Sep 2014 14:00:12 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14792 Author information
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I am a photographer from Salt Lake City, UT. I enjoy shooting food, travel, macro, and lifestyle portraits. I have been in and out of the photography business since 2005, juggling the demands of motherhood (four kiddos) with my love of photography. I feel it is a true gift to be able to express who I am and my everyday through my lens. I find much joy in learning and improving, and in helping others grow. I also love a good sweaty workout, shopping alone, house boating on Lake Powell, sauteed mushrooms, salty & sweet together, and un-interrupted afternoon naps! Looking forward to sharing my knowledge and learning with all of you this year! Website/Blog | Facebook My Camera bag: Nikon D700 | Nikon 85mm f/1.4G | Nikon 24-70 f/2.8G | Nikon 35mm f/2D | Lensbaby Composer Pro| SB-910 Speedlight Flash
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Have you ever seen a macro shot of an insect or flower and wondered how they got the entire subject in focus? In macro photography, you shoot at a close distance, which results in a very shallow depth of field. Even if the lens is closed down to its smallest aperture such as f/22, it is difficult to achieve focus on the entire subject, foreground to background. Typically only a single plane of focus will look sharp.

For example, notice the single plane of focus in this image, taken with my Nikon 105mm f/2.8 macro lens. Looking closely, the parts of the leaves in front of and behind the plane of focus is blurred.

_IMG4901

So in order to achieve a greater depth of field, with sharp focus on all planes, there’s a little trick you can do in Photoshop called focus stacking. In a nutshell, you take several images of your subject, each with different areas in focus, then merge them all together in post processing. The result is one image that is perfectly focused, front to back!

 SETTING UP YOUR SHOT

-Use a tripod so that each shot is in the same position.

-Choose a subject that is not moving.

-Shoot in manual mode so your settings don’t automatically change from image to image.

-Keep your tripod steady and try not to move your camera up or down as you change the focus points.

-Shoot in high resolution and in raw for the best clarity.

TAKING THE SHOT

-Use the same camera settings for the entire series of images you take.

-Manually focus for full control.

-Compose wide with extra room on the sides for cropping. There will be some overlapping on the edges after the images are stacked. Allow room to crop those rough edges out.

-I recommend using live view on the back of your camera rather than looking through the eyepiece for a larger view of what’s in focus.

-Start with one area in focus and click the shutter.

-For your next shot, move your focus point so it falls on a different area.

-Overlap areas of focus slightly to ensure that nothing gets missed.

-I recommend starting near the edges with your focusing, then work your way across the frame.

-Take as many shots as you need in order to get all the areas of the image you want in focus.

Notice in this set of images I changed my areas of focus in each image, but kept the same angles and alignment. Remember, when you place a focus point on a part of your subject, it will focus not only that point, but everything within the same plane.

focus plane1focus plane2focus plane3

POST-PROCESSING/MERGING YOUR IMAGES

-Import your images into Lightroom or Photoshop. If you need to make any adjustments to a single image, make sure you apply those same changes to all the images so they will merge more smoothly.

-If you are using Lightroom, export your images into their own folder once you have made adjustments.

-Create a new file in Photoshop with each image on its own layer. Do this by choosing File>Automate>Photomerge.

-Next, click the browse button and locate your images in your folder. Select the images you want to use then click Open.

-Leave layout on “auto” and unselect the three options on the bottom. Click OK.

screen shot blend

-This will put all your images in one file on separate layers.

-Next, select all your layers in your layers palette and go to Edit>Auto Blend Layers.

-Select Stack Images and Seamless Tones and Colors.

-This may take several minutes to complete, depending on how many images you are using.

screenshot select layers

And voila! What you have is a blended image that is perfectly in focus with an increased depth of field! You will notice the edges may be a little rough. Flatten the layers then crop the rough edges out.

For my final image I edited out the tie on the stem and cropped to a square.

Orchid stacked crop

The more you play around with this image technique, the better you will get! This knowledge will come in handy not only for macro work, but for landscapes when you want to achieve a sharper depth of field in the foreground as well as the background.

Let me know if you have any questions! Link me up to your images if you try this out. I would love to see them!

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I am a photographer from Salt Lake City, UT. I enjoy shooting food, travel, macro, and lifestyle portraits. I have been in and out of the photography business since 2005, juggling the demands of motherhood (four kiddos) with my love of photography. I feel it is a true gift to be able to express who I am and my everyday through my lens. I find much joy in learning and improving, and in helping others grow. I also love a good sweaty workout, shopping alone, house boating on Lake Powell, sauteed mushrooms, salty & sweet together, and un-interrupted afternoon naps! Looking forward to sharing my knowledge and learning with all of you this year! Website/Blog | Facebook My Camera bag: Nikon D700 | Nikon 85mm f/1.4G | Nikon 24-70 f/2.8G | Nikon 35mm f/2D | Lensbaby Composer Pro| SB-910 Speedlight Flash
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Critique Me – Tammy at T Benton Photography http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-tammy-t-benton-photography/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-tammy-t-benton-photography/#comments Mon, 08 Sep 2014 13:10:11 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14817 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thank you to Tammy at T Benton Photography for submitting the following image.
Settings: ISO 200 | f/2.8 | ss 1/1250
TBenton Photography

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Critique Me – Anna Kirkpatrick http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-anna-kirkpatrick/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-anna-kirkpatrick/#comments Mon, 01 Sep 2014 13:25:09 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14778 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thank you to Anna Kirkpatrick for submitting the following image.
Settings: SS 1/100 | f/1.8 | ISO 100
Anna Kirkpatrick

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6 Tips for Storytelling Photography http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/storytelling-photography/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/storytelling-photography/#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 12:00:48 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14760 Author information
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Although I love to take posed portrait images, my main photography inspiration comes from my desire to capture those mundane, everyday moments with my son. I want these photographs to be able to transport me back to the day the photo was taken, to that very moment in time. Whilst most definitely a single image can do that, I regularly find myself telling these everyday “stories” through several shots. When viewed together, these images allow me to create a more meaningful collection of memories than a single image could. There are several types of images that I try to take when storytelling, which I thought I would share with you today.

1. The Introductory Shot
First off, I usually take a couple of shots help set the scene. Generally, this is a wider shot that shows where the activity is taking place – a pullback of sorts that shows where we are and what we are doing. However, this can be of a photo of just one detail – for example the box of cake mix if we are baking cakes, or the table set with paints and blank paper.

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch

2. The Detail Shot
I love detail shots and will generally take a few of these, depending on how much time I have and how many things I want to capture. This could be little hands holding the paintbrush, or pictures of the paints themselves, or a brow furrowed in concentration – anything that shows the smaller elements of the story that can help to pull everything together.

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-2

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-3

3. The Portrait Shot
I nearly always try to get a clear shot of my son’s face – the more natural this is, the better, so I will never ask him to look at the camera for this. However, I will try to position myself so that the light on his face is the most flattering it can be. Many times when shooting indoors, the background is pretty messy (and I generally don’t tidy up, for photos, or in life for that matter) so I normally use a very shallow depth of field to blur out what’s going on in the background.

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-4

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-5

4. The Moment Shot
This can take a bit of patience! This is the shot where you get a great expression, or a momentary connection between two people, or capture the apex of an activity. In the photo below, it’s my son’s expression and the fact that he is in mid bite that makes this as a “moment” shot for me.

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-6

5. The End Shot
I always try to remember to wrap up the story with a final photograph. This could be photographing the end result, such as the finished picture we were painting, or the mess that was left behind, or the cakes cooling on the rack. This can be of whatever seems like a natural place to end your story, in this case, his half finished lunch.

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-7

6. Getting it all in ONE shot
Some times, less is more. If moving in and around my subject would disturb the scene too much, or I can say everything I wanted in one shot, then I will leave it at one. For example the photo below has everything I need to remember that moment – the pajamas tell me it’s morning, the toast in his hand that he’s eating breakfast, the wideness of the shot shows me he’s up on my dryer looking out into the garden through the window. I don’t even need to see his face to know that he is content. Whilst this would make an excellent introduction shot, and from here I could have gone to photograph his face, his toast, his feet etc. – doing so would have ruined the peaceful mood, and therefore changed the very thing I wanted to capture.

Storytelling photography by Audrey Yates via Click it Up a Notch-8

Some other tips to help with your storytelling:

-A “story” doesn’t need to be of a special day or a big adventure – even small insignificant moments (like having eggs for lunch ) can be told as a story. Our most cherished memories are often from everyday moments.

-You can tell long stories (for example a day in the life project) or short ones like the one shown above, which happen over just a few minutes.

-Shoot from a variety of angles– above, below and from both sides, wide and close up. Mix it up!

-Rather than trying to remember the above as a shot list, simply think about having a beginning, middle and an end, or even the classic storytelling principles of who, where, when, what and why.

-Try to position yourself and your subjects so you have the most flattering light. Shooting indoors always means high ISO’s for me so I try to over-expose a touch to keep noise at a minimum.

-I don’t tidy up around my subjects, because I want the scene to be as real as possible – but if you do, make sure that you are not removing elements that help tell the full story or just add something to it.

-Shoot from the heart. When you try to photograph to a formula, your photos won’t have the same resonance when you look back on them in ten or twenty year’s time. The above series is far from being technically or compositionally perfect, but it works for me because I can both see and feel that moment in time in these images, despite all the things I could or should have done differently.

Read more about storytelling photography

- Creativity Photography Exercise: Perspective for Storytelling
- Creating a photo essay

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Audrey YatesAudrey – Guest Writer
Hi! I’m a stay-at-home mom and hobbyist photographer, who loves to try to capture the beauty in simple everyday moments and things. Life has a habit of flying past you without you even realizing it, so photography is my way of slowing it down and soaking up as much of it as I can.
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Hiring a Photographer Abroad http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/hiring-photographer-abroad/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/hiring-photographer-abroad/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 18:31:33 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14739 Author information
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Have you read our two previous posts on travel photography? Be sure to check those out.
Travel photography: What to pack
Travel photography: 12 Tips for Europe

Shortly after we booked our trip to Europe, I knew I wanted to hire a photographer to capture my husband and I in Paris. After all, we were going to celebrate our 10 year anniversary and I have always dreamed of having photos taken in front of the Eiffel Tower.

Why hire a photographer abroad?

You have seen the typical vacation photos, one person in the picture in front of the Eiffel Tower, then the other person in the picture in front of the Eiffel Tower. I knew I wanted images of my husband together in Paris. At cafes, in front of the Eiffel Tower, and walking around. I wanted to have our time their captured in a way that I knew I wouldn’t be able to do.

I didn’t have to worry about making sure I always handed over my camera to have proof that I was there because we had a photography session. Not only was there proof but there was proof we enjoyed our time.

Plus, I was spending all that money to go on the trip, I wanted proof that we were there. I plan on hiring a photographer each time we travel abroad to capture our time in different cities.

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch
Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

What to look for when hiring a photographer abroad

1. Find someone who speaks your language.
I knew we needed to find a photographer who spoke English. What little French I took in high school, I knew it wouldn’t be enough to communicate with the photographer. I quickly searched “English speaking Paris Photographer”. Besides Google, Clickin’ Moms CMPro section has a place for you to look for photographer by location and speciality.

2. Ask for recommendations.
The first photographer I found, I really liked. I emailed her but she was booked when we would be in town. She kindly recommended three of her friends and I’m so thankful she did. That is how we found our AMAZING photographer, Katie Donnelly.

3. Pick a date towards the end of your trip.
If possible, choose to do your photo shoot towards the end of your trip. This allows you to go back to any of your favorite locations to have your photos taken there.

4. Plan on waking up early.
If you are in a big city and want photos in front of a huge tourist attraction, then you will want to get their early.

5. Communicate your vision.
Don’t be afraid to ask your photographer for location suggestions. I loved that Katie gave us some ideas of some places off the beaten path. I didn’t want to only capture the big tourist attractions but I wanted to capture a little of the uniqueness that is Paris.

6. Create a Pinterest board of THEIR work
I pinned images from her website. I was hiring Katie because I adored her work, so why would I pin things from other photographers? I went back through her blog and galleries to look at past sessions. The posing, location, light, and feel and pinned those images. Then I emailed her my pin board to help give her a clear vision of what I loved about her work and what I was hoping to be able to capture in my own images. If you can’t find at least 5-10 images that you adore of theirs that you could pin, maybe that isn’t the photographer for you.

7. Don’t forget about what you are wearing.
I packed light for Europe, like super light. But I sure did pack a pair of black high heels that I only wore for the photo shoot. I know it sounds crazy but I wanted pretty pictures of me in Paris in heels. Crazy? Probably, but I don’t care. It’s okay to pack a separate outfit that you may only wear for your photos. Need help coming up with ideas of what to wear? Read – 11 tips for what to wear in family photos

Like I said before, I LOVED our photographer Katie Donnelly. If you are heading to Paris, you should really consider hiring her. She was a pleasure to work with and I can’t wait to frame my images. I also plan on making a photo book of the images from our session. You better believe these images aren’t going to live on my computer.

If you do decide to hire Katie, tell her you found her on Click it Up a Notch and receive 10% off your session if booked and photographed by March 1, 2015.

Here are a few more images from our session in Paris with Katie.
Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

Hiring a photographer abroad via Click it Up a Notch

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Critique Me – Michelle Kelly http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/critique-michelle-kelly/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/critique-michelle-kelly/#comments Mon, 25 Aug 2014 13:52:22 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14732 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thank you to Michelle Kelly for submitting the following image, which was her first attempt at manual mode.
Settings: ISO 200 | SS 1/640 | f/5.6
Michelle Kelly

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How to Display a Lot of Photos http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/photo-display/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/photo-display/#comments Fri, 22 Aug 2014 13:55:23 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14723 Author information
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Wall space can be a serious dilemma for lots of people. Consider my office. Though my blog would have you believe that it is a large and light filled space with ample amounts of room for the many creative endeavors I pursue, it is not. Thus, my need to find a way to artfully display the many images I take of my growing children.

Of course, my dilemma is exacerbated by the fact that I am a photographer by trade and tend to have a lot of images of new photos of my kids all of the time. What is a blogging, photographing, mother to do?

It was a fateful trip to the dollar store that gave me the idea. I found these plastic bags full of tiny clothespins. Laughing I wondered just who might use them…gnomes…hobbits…wait a minute! My mind snapped to the empty wall space near my work area, and suddenly I knew who would be using those pins.

How to display photos easily and cheap by Amy Lee via Click it Up a Notch

When I got home I tested my theory and found that it would indeed work. My vision was this:

I theorized that I could wrap a bit of foam in a favorite fabric, wrap this with some lighter string, and then use those hobbit-sized clothespins to clip an ever changing array of my children’s photos.

It worked like a charm, and I began encouraging my clients and readers to use this same method for making impressive displays and also for creating a very easy system for updating their photo gallery

See more examples of Photo Wall Display Ideas.

Screen Shot 2014-08-22 at 9.44.38 AM

Another method I use to display a lot of photos is to compile the photos into a photo book. I either display the book like a coffee book or display it on a ledge with our framed photos. I get all my photo books through Blurb and I include quotes or letters I write to the kids to make it more meaningful.

In this age of digital cameras, enormous memory cards, and easy to use printing services, you can take heart! You don’t have to reign in your enthusiasm over the best shots of your kids and your family. You can click as many images as you want because you can create amazingly affordable, flexible, and downright charming displays using little more than string and clips!

See more photo book ideas:
- 3 steps to make a photo book in Lightroom
- Digital photo books: What to do with all your photos
- Photo albums – What to do with all those photos Part 2

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Guest Post – Amy Lee
Amy Lee blogs at The Connection We Share where she shares children photo tips, kid friendly diy’s and kid approved recipes. She believes photos are meant to be seen and shared which is why she prints them out large and small to display in her home. Since wall space is becoming limited in her home, she puts a lot of photos in photo books. Amy loves hanging out in the backyard with her children picking all sorts of berries. On rainy days, she enjoys crafting with her kids, especially with activities from Kiwi Crate craft kits.

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Photography Editing Workflow – Lightroom -> Photoshop -> BlogStomp http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/photography-editing-workflow-lightroom-photoshop-blogstomp/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/08/photography-editing-workflow-lightroom-photoshop-blogstomp/#comments Wed, 20 Aug 2014 12:00:06 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14706 Author information
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Photography Editing Workflow by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

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When I first started using my DSLR on a regular basis I really began to understand why having a trusted and consistent photography editing workflow when handling your images was so important. In the first few months of shooting and editing consistently, I found myself buried in a ridiculous amount of files, folders, copies of files and duplicate images. I was grasping at straws saving images all over the place without any rhyme or reason to what I was doing.

And I was frustrated.

Once I began doing photo shoots for clients, I knew it was imperative that I get a system in place. I sat down and organized my thoughts about a editing workflow and organization system for my photo shoots.

The system I came up with has been working well for me, so I wanted to share my process in hopes to encourage you to start a system of your own if you don’t already have one!

This system will work well for photo shoots or just every day general photos that you might be taking of your family, your life or just for fun!

Once I am done shooting I import all the digital files from my CF or SD card onto the hard drive of my computer. I organize all of my files by year/month/date _event.
Since I sometimes shoot different events on the same day, this system works well for me to keep everything in its place and easy to find!

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

Once the images are copied to my hard drive, I eject the CF or SD card and put it back into my camera and format it. This way I know the card is fresh every time I go to use my camera and I don’t run into double copying files onto my computer.

Then I open Lightroom and upload the event.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

Once all photos are uploaded into LR I begin my cull. I take a run through each photo and look for a few things. I look for closed eyes, weird expressions, blurry or out of focus shots, “practice” shots, or shots where exposure was so severely missed that it really is not worth fixing in post processing. I also look for amazing shots or favorites straight off the bat.

I put my fingers on the #5 key, the x key and the “next” arrow key. (The 5 key will rate the photo 5 stars The X key will mark the photo as rejected.)

If I absolutely love a photo or series of photos in one pose I click the 5. If eyes are closed or its blurry or something is really wrong with the photo and I KNOW I will never use it again, I hit the X key, and then just keep clicking the right arrow key until I get through the entire session.

Once I get through the initial run through I check to see how many photos I have marked in each category. In a typical photo session I upload around 350 – 400 images. I usually have around 100 marked for deletion and 100 marked as 5’s.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

Once I am done with the initial run through I separate out my marked for deleting photos and right click, remove, delete from disk. This permanently deletes those photos out of Lightroom and off of my hard drive.

Then I select my photos marked as 5 stars.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

Many of the photos I marked as 5’s will be the same or very similar image but my subjects may have a different expression. I photograph a LOT of families with small children and we all know that small children do not sit still for long and they will often will showcase many different expressions in a very small amount of time.

I go through all of my similar photos using the compare feature in LR and any photo that doesn’t “win” the comparison, gets marked with 4 stars which I call my “runner ups”.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

I will go through all of my 5 photos and narrow down even further. After looking at the full set of my favorites, it is easier for me to pull out the best of that bunch. Anything that doesn’t make that cut gets changed to a 4 star rating.

This should leave me with between 15-40 final images that I am going to edit for my client. My photo packages come with galleries of between 15-40 images so depending on the package the client wanted, I narrow down accordingly.

Once I have my final set of images to edit, I begin going through them one by one to make minor changes to exposure, white balance, highlights, contrast, clarity, sharpness and profile correction. If I have many in the same sequence/lighting I will use the Sync feature in Lightroom which saves me oodles of time!

Once I am satisfied with the photos in LR, I will take a few over to Photoshop if I feel like they need some major work or if I want to apply a special action. The process to do this is so simple; I was shocked when I first learned how to do it!

When in a photo in LR, simply right click and select, “edit photo in PS”. This will automatically open the photo in PS, and I can apply select actions or editing to the photo in PS.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

Once I am done with it in PS, I simply flatten the image, and then exit the photo. It will prompt me to save and I click yes and then the image is transported back to LR with all of my PS changes.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

So now I have two images in LR, my pre PS photo and my post PS photo.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

I then change the rating on the pre PS photo to a 3 and leave the rating on the final edited photo as a 5.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

After I am done editing all of the photos I have selected as finals, its time for exporting!

Exporting photos in LR is extremely easy and so flexible depending on what you need. I recently added BlogStomp to my toolbox which has made my exporting process even easier!

Once I am done with my final set of images, I export them back into the original file folder with all of my RAW files. I put them in a folder called Client. I export them at 80% and 300dpi.

Photography Editing Workflow - Lightroom | Photoshop | BlogStomp by Cinnamon Wolfe via Click it Up a Notch

Then I choose one or two photos from the set, put them in BlogStomp to watermark them and then save them to my shared Dropbox folder on my computer. These photos I use as sneak peeks to post to Facebook and Instagram. Since I have Dropbox on my phone and laptop as well, the photos I have saved in Dropbox are accessible from all of my devices so I can upload to FB or IG on the go!

Then I choose the entire set of images and put them in BlogStomp and create collages from the set that I will use on my blog. I save all of those collages into my Dropbox folder as well. Then when I am ready to blog the session I have all of the images sized and ready to upload into my blog.

I upload the final images to the client gallery and send them an email letting them know everything is ready.

Once I got this system down, my editing process time decreased by about 50%. That is more time I can spend growing my business or spending with my family.

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IMG_2110Cinnamon Wolfe – Guest Post
I am a natural light photography junkie living in the middle of the high desert of California. Wife to an energetic Army husband, stepmom to an awesome teenager and pet mom to two silly pups, my days are never the same in the best way possible. When not behind a camera, I occupy my time by laughing, asking deep questions, drinking coffee and reading books. I will never turn down dark chocolate or stinky cheese.
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