Click it Up a Notch http://clickitupanotch.com Photography Tips: Basic Photography Tips Mon, 20 Oct 2014 23:26:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Critique Me – Chanel French http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/critique-chantel-french/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/critique-chantel-french/#comments Mon, 20 Oct 2014 13:37:21 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=15119 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thanks to Chanel French for submitting the following image.
Settings: ISO 100 | f/2.8 | SS 1/400
Chantel French

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10 Photography Projects for Kids http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/photography-projects-for-kids/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/photography-projects-for-kids/#comments Wed, 15 Oct 2014 13:58:29 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=15102 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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10 Photography Projects for Kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” I ask my 4 year old one day, just for fun.

Imagine my beaming smile when she exclaimed, “A camera lady, like mommy!” Just as I’ve watched my daughter grow into herself as a little girl, she’s watched me grow into my role as a photographer these last few years, and now wants to take part in the photo taking too.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

I may be the primary memory keeper for our family, but that doesn’t mean that I have to be the only one. Photography is a tool that can educate, inspire, and connect our entire family.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

Today, I’ve got 10 fun, educational, and play-based photography projects for kids. These projects will have you thinking a bit outside of the box, allow your creativity to flow, and get the whole family involved behind the lens. Some of these projects will put you in the driver’s seat, and others will allow your children to snap away. They may not all be activities that will pave the way to frame worthy, award winning shots, but they are sure to get you smiling and connecting more, using a tool you already love.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

10 Photography Projects for Kids

1. Guessing Game
Go out on a photo walk and take photos of objects, both ‘close up’ and ‘far away’. (This would be a great opportunity to play with a macro lens if you have one!) Pull up each of the close up images and see if your kids can guess what they are. Reveal the far away shot with the answer to see if they’re right.

2. Digital stories
Take your child’s favorite toys on an adventure! Allow your child to take the lead and come up with a fantastic plot, taking the toy around the house or out and about with you for the day. Write down the story as you go along. Compile the story digitally, or have it printed and snuggle up with your child to re-read it together.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

3. Collage Art
This is a great activity for all ages! Go to the craft store and get yourself a large cardboard/wood monogram letter, mod podge, one color of acrylic paint, and foam brushes. Print meaningful photos off on your home printer, cut to size, and mod podge them to the front of the letter (mod podge should be brushed both on the back and front of the photos). Allow the photos to dry. Paint acrylic paint on the back of the letter and then mod podge the entire letter a second time to seal. Hang the letter somewhere in your home, or give as a gift!

4. Cloning Magic
Your kids will get a kick out of this one! Set up your camera on a tripod. Take multiple shots of your child doing various activities in one location. I suggest no more than 4-5 poses to start. Once all the poses are captured, pull them into Adobe Photoshop or Elements. Layer two of the shots in one document, and erase away parts of the top layer to reveal a ‘clone’. Flatten and repeat. Do this until all of the clones make it into the image, then save.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

5. Time Lapse
This is one I really love to do with my iPhone because it’s so easy! (especially with iOS 8 since it’s now part of the camera App). But if you’re looking for a separate App, Lapse It or HyperLapse are good options too. Time Lapse videos are also an easy way that the whole family can be included in shots. Set up the camera on a tripod (or ask a willing partner to hold it), get a location framed out, and then play together with toys, stuffed animals, bikes, the dog, etc…

6. Letter or Word Hunt
Create your own photo art by taking a scavenger hunt for objects that look like letters in your town or community. You could search for each letter of the alphabet or simply try to create a word of your choosing, such as your name or an inspirational message.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

7. If I Were
Give your kids the opportunity to dive into some creative editing by transforming a photo into something totally unique. I absolutely love the site ‘PicMonkey’ to allow children to explore artistic expression using photos as a base. One of the fun activities I used to do with kids, during my elementary school teaching days, was have them turn a portrait of themselves into a famous American such as George Washington or Abraham Lincoln. Kids could also use the program to make comic strips, transform their images into watercolor illustrations, or create their own greeting cards.

8. Day In The Life
Ordinary moments are often when I have the greatest difficulty picking up the camera, but they’re also the times I most want to capture too. I started a project to help hold me accountable, and aims to capture our ordinary days from start to finish. I set up a timer on my phone to ding every hour, for one day, and stop whatever it is we are all doing to snap a photo when it goes off. The kiddo loves the anticipation of waiting for that timer to go off and becomes a more willing participant in the photo taking, since it’s tied to a meaningful family project.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

9. POV Comparison
I find it compelling to watch how my children compose and frame shots. They haven’t developed a sense of perfectionism behind the lens, they snap away with ease, and they have a natural eye for composition. I like to go on photo walks with my daughter where we both take photos of the same thing: the same flower, tree, dog, bird, sky, etc. When we get home, it leads to rich conversations where we can compare and contrast our images together.

10. Return to Happy
A few months ago, I was finding that our afternoons were a disaster at home. We were cranky, bored, moody and just plain tired. So I came up with this simple gratitude challenge parents and kids can do together. In the moments were you notice your day is starting to go downhill, stop everything. Talk with your kids about what makes them happy and what is right in their world. Both you and the kids list out 5 ‘happy items’ and then grab a camera and find ways to photograph them. Instant mood changer.

10 photography projects for kids by Beryl Young via Click it Up a Notch

blueline

Beryl Young Beryl Young – Guest Writer
Beryl Ayn Young believes that there is magic hidden inside your camera, and she’s here to help you love your photos and your life. She is a professional photographer by chance and a teacher to the core. Pop over to her site and register for a completely free two-week class, Embrace Your Phone: A Start To Finish System For Printing and Preserving The Endless Photos In Your Pocket beginning October 20th, 2014.

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Critique Me – Chloe Adler http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/critique-chloe-adler/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/critique-chloe-adler/#comments Mon, 13 Oct 2014 14:03:03 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=15097 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thanks to Chloe for submitting the following image.
Settings: ISO 400 | SS 1/250 | f/5.6
Chloe Adler

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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Photo Wall Display-Symmetry http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/photo-wall-display-symmetry/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/photo-wall-display-symmetry/#comments Fri, 10 Oct 2014 14:00:53 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14992 Author information
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I am a natural light photographe. I spend my days with my 3 “littles” searching for the mundane moments I can make extraordinary through my lenses. I enjoy editing my photos in Lightroom just as much as I love shooting them! On a personal note– I love coffee, reading non-fiction and Justin Timberlake on SNL.
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I love a good gallery wall. I love all the asymmetrical displays I see gracing the pins on my Pinterest feed. I even tried a few configurations in my home….but they just felt wrong to me. I am such a huge fan of symmetry. It makes me heart sing.

My pride and joy is this wall here at the top of our stairs! I have to give all the credit to my husband for executing my vision so perfectly! He has the patience of a Saint!

DSC_9813

DSC_9809

I have this quirky little hallway that I felt needed some photos. I had the thermostat and light switch to contend with, so I used frames of the same size, but one is vertical and one is horizontal. It’s not literal symmetry, but it feels very balanced.

DSC_9821

DSC_9816

DSC_9820

I love peeking into homes to see how other display their photos, so I hope you’ve enjoyed a little sneak peek into mine.

See more photo wall displays

7 tips for choosing which images to print for your home
Photo display ideas by Elicia Graves
How to make a photo wall display

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I am a natural light photographe. I spend my days with my 3 “littles” searching for the mundane moments I can make extraordinary through my lenses. I enjoy editing my photos in Lightroom just as much as I love shooting them! On a personal note– I love coffee, reading non-fiction and Justin Timberlake on SNL.
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Lensbaby Sweet 50 Optic Review + Tips http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/lensbaby-sweet-50-optic-review-tips/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/lensbaby-sweet-50-optic-review-tips/#comments Wed, 08 Oct 2014 14:29:20 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14961 Author information
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I am a photographer from Salt Lake City, UT. I enjoy shooting food, travel, macro, and lifestyle portraits. I have been in and out of the photography business since 2005, juggling the demands of motherhood (four kiddos) with my love of photography. I feel it is a true gift to be able to express who I am and my everyday through my lens. I find much joy in learning and improving, and in helping others grow. I also love a good sweaty workout, shopping alone, house boating on Lake Powell, sauteed mushrooms, salty & sweet together, and un-interrupted afternoon naps! Looking forward to sharing my knowledge and learning with all of you this year! Website/Blog | Facebook My Camera bag: Nikon D700 | Nikon 85mm f/1.4G | Nikon 24-70 f/2.8G | Nikon 35mm f/2D | Lensbaby Composer Pro| SB-910 Speedlight Flash
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Lensbaby Sweet 50 Optic Review and Tips

Lensbaby sent me their newest optic that was released this month, the Sweet 50 Optic, in exchange for a review.  I of course was so excited for the opportunity and I couldn’t wait to try it out!  I’ve been playing around with it for a few weeks and I want to share with you what I’ve learned, along with some tips on using it.

fountains

Magical. Mysterious. Dreamy. Surreal. These are words that describe what I see in the images I’ve taken with the Sweet 50. Portrait, travel, and landscape photographers wanting to push their creativity to a new level will love this lens!

The Sweet 50mm Optic is an addition to Lensbaby’s Optic Swap System that is compatible with the Lensbaby Composer Pro, Muse, Control Freak and Scout lens bodies. If you are not familiar with Lensbaby, it has several optics with different focal lengths or capabilities that can be removed from the lens body and switched.

*Important note, you need the Lensbaby Composer Pro in order to connect the Sweet 50 Optic to your camera.

The Sweet 50 is a selective focus 50mm lens that goes from apertures of f/2.5 to f/22. The aperture is changed on the exterior of the lens, rather than in camera. When changed, it controls the depth of field, and the size of the sweet spot of focus. The sweet spot is the area of the image that is in sharp focus, surrounded by increasing blur to edges of the frame.

DSC_7200 web

The 50mm focal length is versatile for all types of photography. It’s considered a normal length, so it also works well for portraits. I have the Sweet 35 Optic as well, so I was able to compare it to the 50. The only noticeable difference between the two was the focus distance to the subject. The Sweet 35 focused at a distance of 7.5 inches, and the 50 focused at 18 inches away. So you will need a little more room to work with the 50.  It is compatible with macro converters if you want  a closer focus. I loved the 50 the most for travel and landscapes. Inside the house in tight spaces I prefer the 35.

In order to get both mom and baby in focus in this next image (using the Sweet 50) I stood about 10 feet away and used an aperture of f/5.6.

evelina

Portraits are a little trickier with the Lensbaby and take some practice. You will need a subject who can stay still while you select the sweet spot and manually focus. However, the beauty of the Lensbaby is the blurred effect. Some may desire an out of focus subject, depending on the look and feel they are trying to achieve.

For example, in this next image of my little guy I wasn’t as concerned with perfect focus as I was with him running towards the tree in the light. He’s slightly out of focus, but it lends to the dreamy feeling of the image. Also note that I took the next two images of the tree with my film camera. I wanted to compare the optic using film vs. digital. Both cameras gave me similar results with the sweet spot & blur, as well as with how the lens performed. I was happy to find out I could use it for both types of photography!

treeb&w_film web

The blur gives an ordinary image a unique creative twist. This is the same tree as the image above. Might be a boring shot without the Lensbaby. Using my focus points on my camera, I chose the tree branches as my sweet spot, and used an aperture of f/5.6. This created a slice of focus that leads the viewer’s eye to the tree. What I really love about the effect of the Lensbaby is the blur actually appears to be moving across the image, which seems to rush your eyes to the sweet spot.

tree_film web

FOCUSING TIPS

Focusing the Lensbaby takes some practice. You must manually focus. The Lensbaby Composer Pro (holds the Sweet 50) tilts in any direction. When tilted it gives different effects of blur to the image. For example, if you tilt the lens upward, it places the sweet spot in the upper ⅓ of the image. Tilted down, focus is in the lower ⅓ of image. This film image was shot tilted up. The tilt gives the blur a stretched effect, which almost creates the look of leading lines!

mountains tilted up

And this one tilted down.

letters tilted down

When using the Lensbaby, I found it easier to achieve sharp focus when:

  1. Aperture is set to f/4 or above. Start small, then increase your f-stops until you get what you want in focus.
  2. There’s plenty of light to work with. I found the lens grabs focus easier in areas of high contrast between light/dark.
  3. Tilting it up/down rather than left/right…but focuses best when it’s in the middle. Not sure why it’s weaker on the left/right tilt, but it is.
  4. The sweet spot is placed in the center of the frame. All lenses focus better in the center, so this is no surprise. But don’t let that limit you. Start practicing in the center, then experiment in the outer focus areas once you’re comfortable with how it works.

One last tip on focusing. Sometimes its hard to tell whether you have achieved focus. Pay attention to the green dot focus indicator and the two arrows on either side of it. You will see them at the bottom left when you look inside your viewfinder.

When these symbols appear it means:

Dot: subject is in focus.

Arrow to right of dot: Focused on an area between camera and subject.

Arrow to left of dot: Focused on an area behind the subject

I found that I could use my focus points to select the general area of my sweet spot, but I still had to move my camera slightly up/down or left/rt until it grabbed the right area. Watching for the green dot to appear helps you know when you’ve nailed focus.

I shot images with the lens at every aperture. The only aperture I didn’t care for was f/11 and f/22. You need a lot of  light to work in these apertures, which I could only find in bright sunlight. And in my opinion, the effect of the sweet spot and blur wasn’t as pronounced in the upper apertures either. So it appeared to look more like a normal lens. And that defeated the whole purpose of the creative look of the lens.

MY RECOMMENDATION

The more you play with the Lensbaby and Sweet 50 Optic the more you will like it! I honestly didn’t love my first Lensbaby product when I first got it because I wasn’t familiar with how it worked. After experimenting with different apertures and sweet spots I had more control over focusing and composition. I found that the most compelling images taken with the Sweet 50 were ones that had an interesting focal point. Look for that first, then play with the various apertures/tilts until you get the look you want.

Overall, the lens performed as expected and advertised. I was pleased with the results I got from it, and I would definitely recommend it to a friend! I’ll end with a couple more images of my hometown of Salt Lake City, taken with the Sweet 50 Optic. If you get in a creative rutt, buy this lens! It will turn an ordinary image into something extraordinary, and you will see things in a whole new way!

slc web

sl temple web

Read more about Lensbaby:
Lensbaby Composer Pro with Sweet 35mm Optic – 6 Lessons Learned
Lensbaby Inspiration

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I am a photographer from Salt Lake City, UT. I enjoy shooting food, travel, macro, and lifestyle portraits. I have been in and out of the photography business since 2005, juggling the demands of motherhood (four kiddos) with my love of photography. I feel it is a true gift to be able to express who I am and my everyday through my lens. I find much joy in learning and improving, and in helping others grow. I also love a good sweaty workout, shopping alone, house boating on Lake Powell, sauteed mushrooms, salty & sweet together, and un-interrupted afternoon naps! Looking forward to sharing my knowledge and learning with all of you this year! Website/Blog | Facebook My Camera bag: Nikon D700 | Nikon 85mm f/1.4G | Nikon 24-70 f/2.8G | Nikon 35mm f/2D | Lensbaby Composer Pro| SB-910 Speedlight Flash
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Critique Me – Melissa at Unique Impressions by Melissa http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/critique-melissa-unique-impressions-melissa/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/critique-melissa-unique-impressions-melissa/#comments Mon, 06 Oct 2014 14:34:59 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=15084 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thanks to Melissa at Unique Impressions by Melissa for submitting the following image.
Settings:ISO 100 | SS 1/200 | f/5
Click-it-up-a-notch

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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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5 Tips for Photographing an Older Only Child http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/photographing-older-child/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/photographing-older-child/#comments Fri, 03 Oct 2014 13:09:28 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14937 Author information
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I am a natural light photographer dedicated to shooting my everyday, ordinary life as it unfolds here in Southern California. I love seeing my life through the lens of my camera while photographing the people and moments that I don’t want to forget in my life. I am excited to share what I have learned along the way here at Click It Up a Notch!
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5 tips to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

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There are tons of tips for photographing your family, siblings, and younger kids both in lifestyle and posed sessions. But sometimes I feel stuck for ways to get creative shooting my only (and slightly older) child. Here are some tips that I use to help me out of a shooting rut.

1. Photograph the Child Engaged in an Activity
This has got to be one of the easiest ways for me to photograph my child nowadays (when he won’t go for bribes unless they include pretty high priced items like a huge Lego set or staying up past midnight or something else crazy like that!). I stalk him and wait until he is engaged. This includes the everyday things like homework, playing on the iPad, hanging out on the couch, and eating breakfast. It also includes things like the weekly soccer game, boogie boarding at the beach, hiking, exploring at Disney. You know the things we do that are easy to overlook because they might seem mundane as well as the things that he will want to look back on someday & remember.

The below image was taken on a Saturday morning when we were out of coffee at the house.  I asked my son if he wanted to grab breakfast (and coffee for me!) to take to the beach to watch the sunrise.  The beach is a place he likes so I knew we would have time to just hang out there for a bit.  We spent more time talking, looking around & just being together with just a few minutes of photography.  I took my new Lensbaby Composer Pro + Sweet 35 for some practice and it worked out for us both.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

2. Ask the Child to Help You Plan Something
This doesn’t work 100% of the time, but when it does work I have found that getting the buy in from my son can make all the difference in the world. I just ask him directly for his ideas and thoughts about a photo session (and by session I just mean any time I am going to pull the camera out for more of a planned shot rather than shooting our every day). I’m going to be honest & say that he doesn’t always give me an answer and it becomes more about me giving him a multiple choice option. Something like, “Hey, how would you like to go explore that cool looking Regional Park that we saw off the freeway….you know the one with the huge trees…at sunrise tomorrow morning?”  And, then off we go. He thinks of it as exploring & I think of it as expanding my photographic horizons and increasing my chances of getting an updated portrait of him that I like. We both win.

The below photos happened just like I described above.  I had seen a new location that I wanted to try and brainstormed some ways to make it more fun for my son so that it wasn’t all about me.  My son loves to read and loves Disney.  I had this box of antique books from my grandmother with the main Disney characters like Mickey & Donald.  I asked him to help me plan a way to photograph him reading the books that I loved when I was a child.  It worked because he had something to do while I tried out a few new ideas and we were both happy.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

3. Look for the Light
This one seems simple on the surface. Because really, as photographers aren’t we always on the lookout for good light? But what I mean is to look deeper at the possibilities of the light you have. Turn off the lamps during homework time & watch how the shadows fall. Throw open the garage door and explore the wonderful possibilities that are waiting in that amazing space. Use the shadows that fall on the ground during a mid-day walk to the park & use them to enhance your image. You don’t have to wait until the golden hour to get amazing photos, you can be creative at any time of the day!

The below image was taken in my garage using natural light.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

This next image I took just because I liked all the lines that that light was making.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

And in this one I used window light at a coffee shop.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch
 

4. Invite the Neighbor Kids Over
I am so incredibly lucky to have met a local photographer, Kimberly Skeen, who has two kids that are the same age as my son. Finding someone local who you can shoot with and/or chat about photography with is a bonus all on it’s own.  So I feel really lucky that I found someone who is willing to try out crazy ideas with me with our own kids.  One nice thing is that while we are setting up the gear, talking about camera settings, and generally boring the kids they can play with each other.  The other nice thing is that it gives me a chance to photograph more than just one child.  Plus the chances that I have a cooperative subject increase greatly since he sees his friends being cooperative.

The tip here is to combine the above tips + bring in more kids. Find an activity, enlist the child to help you plan, find (or create) interesting light, and then invite over a few more kids. That’s what happened one random summer night with my friend Kim. We waited until dusk, set the kids up with instructions for sparklers (they were super excited) and shot like crazy until the fun was over.  My son is still asking when we can try this again.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

5.  Look for new perspectives.
If you usually shoot your child straight on in a traditional portrait fashion, then try shooting from the ground up or standing on a chair and shooting down.  I love getting in close for detail shots of things.  It also gives my son a break from having the camera in his face all.the.time. if I am shooting something in his hands or just getting his feet in a shot.  Try to get in close, shoot from behind, pull out and get a really wide shot.  Look for ways to capture your child with variety.  It is challenging to come up with new ways to photograph one subject but it will also give you a new way to capture those memories.

How to photograph an older only child via Click it Up a Notch

Read more tips for photographing children:

10 tips to photograph kids together
Photographing you kids in less than 7 minutes
Photography for kids: Activities they can do

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I am a natural light photographer dedicated to shooting my everyday, ordinary life as it unfolds here in Southern California. I love seeing my life through the lens of my camera while photographing the people and moments that I don’t want to forget in my life. I am excited to share what I have learned along the way here at Click It Up a Notch!
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Street Photography Photo Walk – Click Away http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/street-photography-photo-walk-click-away/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/10/street-photography-photo-walk-click-away/#comments Wed, 01 Oct 2014 14:07:10 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14995 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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I had the honor and pleasure at speaking at Click Away in September. First let me say, the conference was AMAZING. I left so inspired! That was exactly what I needed. Listening to the Keynote speakers and the instructors filled my soul.

Besides speaking, I got to lead a street photography photo walk. Man, did we have fun! First off, I got us lost because I’m terrible at reading a map. Thanks for the image to prove my point Olivia at Random Olive.

Random Olive

But these amazing ladies just rolled with it and we walked, laughed, and photographed. It was truly my pleasure to get to meet these amazing photographers.
group photo

Enjoy the eye candy by those who attended. Isn’t it fun to see the walk through each of their lenses. Thank you ladies! I had the best time!

Random Olive 1

Random Olive

Images above by Olivia at Random Olive

Ashlee Baird 1
Ashlee Baird
Images above by Ashlee Baird at Ashlee Baird Photography

Anna Hughes 1

Anna Hughes
Images above by Anna Hughes at Anna Lynn Hughes Photography

Kelly Kendall 1

Kelly Kendall

Images above by Kelly Kendall

Shannon Brooks 1
Shannon Brooks
Images by Shannon Brooks at Shannon Brooks Photography

Madalena Zampaulo 1

Madalena Zampaulo
Images above by Madalena Zampaulo at My Personal Coffee Break

Jennifer Conley

Jennifer Conley 1

Images above by Jennifer Conley at Jennifer Conley Photography

Lindsay Askins 1

Lindsay Askins
Images above by Lindsay Askins at Spot of Serendipity Photography

Jen Doolittle 1

Jen Doolittle
Images above by Jen Doolittle at Songbird and Bear Photography

Tina Fisher 1

Tina Fisher
Images above by Tina Fisher at Tina Fisher Photography

If you would like to learn more about street photography check out Street Photography: 9 Tips to Follow

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Critique Me – Renee at Renee Wright Photography http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-renee-renee-wright-photography/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/critique-renee-renee-wright-photography/#comments Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:00:45 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14861 Author information
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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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Remember:
-Read How to Critique a Photo
-Make a critique sandwich – something positive, something you would have done differently, something positive
-My rule: no improvement tip = deleted comment
-This will benefit the person leaving the photo critique just as much if not more than the person receiving the critique.
-If you would like to have an image critiqued be sure to read How to submit an image for critique.

Thank you to Renee at Renee Wright Photography for submitting the following image.
Settings: ISO 100 | SS 1/320 | f/1.8
Renee Wright Photography

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I combined my passion of teaching and photography to create this website. I invite you to take this 30 day challenge - The Unexpected Everyday
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What to Pack for a Photo Shoot http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/what-to-pack-photo-shoot/ http://clickitupanotch.com/2014/09/what-to-pack-photo-shoot/#comments Fri, 26 Sep 2014 13:43:42 +0000 http://clickitupanotch.com/?p=14929 Author information
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This post was written by a guest poster for Click it Up a Notch. If you are interested in writing a guest post, please email me with your idea at clickitupanotch@gmail.com
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What to pack for a photo shoot via Click it Up a Notch

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From what to wear to what to pack in your camera bag, fully preparing for a photo session is really important. When I was a brand new photographer, packing my camera bag for a photo session was always an anxious process. I wanted to pack everything I owned and was always double or triple checking that everything was packed in its place. I didn’t want to forget anything and overpacking was always easier than not having enough gear. But one year and many photo sessions later, packing my bag is much more simple. I know exactly what I need to put in my camera bag. More importantly, I know exactly what I am going to use during my session versus what stays unused in my bag.

What to pack for a photo session via Click it Up a Notch

Today I am going to share what is in my camera bag. I might even share a secret or two that will help you when interacting with your clients from the moment you meet them to the moment you say goodbye. Since it’s fall, go pour something warm in your cup and grab a pencil and paper. Hopefully I will share something helpful and give you an idea or two.  Let’s start with what is in my bag.

What to pack for a photo shoot via Click it Up a Notch
**You can find the camera strap here**

1. My camera + lenses
I know what you are thinking. You are probably thinking I am crazy for even reminding you to pack your camera and lenses. But bringing the appropriate lenses to a photo session is so important. Not all lenses are created equal. This is where I tend to overpack sometimes. But, if I am being honest, I allow myself to overpack lenses because there is nothing worse than wishing you had a certain lens that would make your shot look that much better. So what are my go-to lenses?

Sigma 50mm f/1.4 
I am just going to be completely truthful and admit that this lens usually stays on my camera throughout the entire session. The low aperture of this lens helps me to achieve a bokeh that I swoon over. More importantly, I find that it works for all types of photography sessions that I provide by simply adjusting the f stop.

Nikon 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 
I always tuck this lens in my bag for “just in case moments.”  Remember when I mentioned that I allow myself to overpack lenses?  Well, this is one of those times.  We all need a little peace of mind when we head to a session, right!?  Having a backup lens in my camera bag simply makes me relax.  This lens is also the only lens in my bag that has zooming capability, so I love carrying it just in case I need a zoom option.

Lensbaby Composer Pro Sweet 35 
It has to be said that this lens requires a little practice!  Well, actually, a lot of practice!  It’s a tricky one but, once you figure it out, the Sweet 35 can help to create very dreamy photographs.  I like to include this in my bag and bring it out when I am photographing adults, products, or landscapes.  In other words, I only use this lens on stationary objects.  On subjects that stay still long enough for me to nail my focus and *{click}!  Someday I will be brave enough to put it on my camera during a child session.  But, for now, those little ones are just too quick for me and this lens!

What to pack for a photo shoot via Click it Up a Notch

2. Lens pen
Even though I clean my gear and lenses the night before each session, I always pack my lens pen for little touch ups throughout the session. But here is where I have a little secret. I love to invite my younger clients to help touch up my lenses before I start the session. {Of course, I hold my camera, supervise them, and kindly remind them to be very gentle.} They always get such a kick out of it! I teach them how to use the little brush to wipe away any dust they may see and tell them that it is their job throughout the entire session to make sure my lens is clean.  I call them my little assistant and their smiles just beam!

This really helps when they look away from the camera because I can quickly say, “Hey kiddo, is my lens still clean!? You are my special assistant!” Then they look into the camera and *{click}, I got the shot! It makes the little kids feel important to have such a special job! Plus, it is much smaller and easier to bring than stuffed animals or toys.  And I need it anyways, just in case I need to touch up my lens!

What to pack for a photo shoot via Click it Up a Notch

3. Contract clipboard
While I do email my contract to clients for them to sign and bring to their session, I always carry a copy with me just in case they don’t bring theirs. Let’s be honest here, sometimes getting all the kids dressed and in a good mood on session day is hectic enough and that darn contract sometimes gets left on the kitchen counter. No worries, I always carry a backup + a pen!  Plus, I always like to skim the contract together to make sure my clients are aware of all my policies.  And it has to be said that the mini clipboard is a lifesaver!

4. Extra camera batteries + memory cards 
Just in case!  Tossing extra batteries in my bag just takes away any worry that my battery might run low or, *{gasp}, run completely out.  The majority of my sessions rarely go over an hour so I usually only use one battery…but, things can always happen! They are small and take up no room at all, so just pack them!

What to pack for a photo shoot via Click it Up a Notch

5. Business Cards
By the time you snap that final photo of the session, clients are really excited and anxious to see how their photos turn out. To make it easy for clients to understand how they can find their photos in the coming weeks, I love to hand out business cards. It is a quick and easy way for me to tell my clients:
“In a couple days you will see a sneak peak of your collection on my Facebook page and, once all of your photos are fully edited, visit my website to see the rest of your photos featured in a blog post.”

And that is it! That’s everything that you will find in my camera bag! But before you go, let’s talk about what you will find me wearing on the day of a session.  We all know you can’t just put on any color and take pictures.

What to pack for a photo shoot via Click it Up a Notch

If you peek into my closet, you will find a lot of shades of oatmeal, gray, and white. For me, these are the only colors that I wear to a session because they are soft shades that do not reflect on the client’s skin or in the client’s eyes.  When I was first starting out, I was told that staying away from bright colors is really important because it helps to avoid creating color reflections on the skin that are unnatural.  Ever since then, I’ve taken this helpful advice!

It’s also really important to feel comfortable during the session. During a typical photo session, you can find me standing on things, kneeling down and laying on the ground to get a particular shot from a certain angle. Because of this, I find that a nice pair of dark skinny jeans are the most comfortable and I stay away from skirts and dresses. It’s important to me that my clothes don’t restrict my movement and allow me to climb high, lay low, and easily run after my younger clients.

Let’s talk about jewelry real quick. I love a nice statement necklace. Especially when wearing a neutral top and some skinny jeans, a necklace can dress up an outfit nicely to keep you looking professional. Plus, jewelry is simply fun!   As I said before, it’s important to stay away from bright colors but also it’s important to stay away from sparkly jewelry. During one of my earlier sessions, I made the mistake of wearing a sparkly watch. I wanted to keep track of time and didn’t think for a second that sparkles would do any harm. Oh, I was wrong! When I got home and imported my session, I gasped! I saw sparkly reflections all over the faces of my clients from the reflection of my watch! It was as if all of my clients had sparkling freckles! Let’s just say that it was an editing nightmare and I learned my lesson. Now I just slip my watch or my phone in my pocket or camera bag.

So there you have it. Everything from what to wear to what to bring in your camera bag to your next session. Even if you aren’t in business and you simply love taking photos of your little ones, try these tips out when you go on your next photography adventure. Now go create some beautiful memories with your cameras!

biopicBeth Deschamp of {beth} a-dilly photography – Guest Post
This curly haired blonde and blue-eyed girl is most content when she is making memories with her little family. Starbucks iced soy chai, paperback books, Instagram, almond vanilla cupcakes, blogging, a glass of bold red wine and snuggling a puppy in her lap are just a few of her favorite things. Her favorite thing about being a photographer is being able to portray the beauty of ordinary things in everyday life. Becoming a photographer has helped her to see the beauty in the little things, and that is a life lesson she will always be grateful for.
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This post was written by a guest poster for Click it Up a Notch. If you are interested in writing a guest post, please email me with your idea at clickitupanotch@gmail.com
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